Leave a review for Faiza Rammuny

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Did you walk away with clarity, hope, or feeling a little more FABULOUS? Leave a review.

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6 thoughts on “Leave a review for Faiza Rammuny

  1. Fazia- you really came through when I needed guidance. Thanks so much for your help and positivity! Keep spreading your great energy and confidence πŸ™‚

    -Parisa

  2. There’s nothing worse than feeling lost and hopeless, like you’ll never get out of the sad bubble you’ve found yourself in. Faiza, I can’t thank you enough. All your blog posts, your Snapchat stories, your Instagram Live sessions have helped me so much. You are so inspiring and supportive! You constantly put a smile on my face, and gave me hope for a better tomorrow. I haven’t been this happy in months and I couldn’t thank you enough!! You are such a beautiful person. Please keep doing what you’re doing. You’re awesome! xoxo

    1. Thank you so much. I’m so honored that I can be a part of your journey and help you find your happy. But truly, it was all YOU!

      Stay FABULOUS!!!

      Faiza

  3. I’ve been feeling that hate toward the rebellion me lately since I’m a Muslim and most importantly a female.
    I don’t understand why the hell should we be perfect while being surrounded with selfish, mean and fuckboys males all the time.
    But after following you and being in the marry me journey a lot of things have changed.
    I could dump the boy I was with who was always pulling me back from living my dreams, being in the journey to success and being the real me.
    I could show off my love for fashion and wear whatever I think looks good on my sure I was judged I was labeled by things I’m sure I don’t deserve but thanks to you no word said about me meant anything anymore.
    after a while I was surrounded by people who now I can say they deserve my time and my friendship
    now I won’t never ever accept to go on a date with anyone until I find out they really truly would deserve me.
    thanks to you I knew how precious I’m and that for no one and for no reason I would pretend to be someone I’m not.

    I love you and I wish you really all the best in your life, I know it can be hard sometimes but no one would judge you or criticize you unless you were that successful.
    keep going.

    love and kind regards,
    Aya

    1. Your growth is inspiring to me! Nothing more to stay besides that. Truly inspiring!

      Stay FABULOUS!!!

      Faiza

      1. Her rebellion is more psychologically nuanced than mere growth. She had an ideal, it did not transpire, she feels neglected/unworthy, and to compensate she has jumped to the opposite end of the spectrum in an attempt to find attention/value. It is more of a cry of help than actual growth – a shame really, since most people around her won’t perceive it, and instead of trying to address the root issue, they will scold her sudden change.

        Women need affirmation, usually in the form of love, and commitment. Not finding that can be quite traumatic, especially when those around them are ‘moving forward’. What ensues thereafter is an attempt to quickly catch up, usually in the form of dating but that will usually falter because they are seeing people they probably wouldn’t under ‘normal’ circumstances, and the accentuated neediness might further impair their ability to rationalise.

        Should the dating scene fail, they will move into a state of ‘neglect’ i.e. they will portray themselves as not interested, or ‘independent’, with one big catch, they are fixated on the other sex, and may sexually embellish themselves excessively (to lure a mate). Although the kind of mate lured by such a means is usually of mediocre callibre.

        It’s sad to see it, and I’ve observed it a few times over the years (I am a man BTW).

        There are a lot of wry folk amongst religious communities; although the problem is generally far greater amongst non-religious communities for obvious reasons. It is more apparent in this epoch due to the excessive fixation on worldly sensualities such as materialism, and nihilism. The F-boys are the direct consequence of spirituality (or a lack of).

        I guess both of you should look at the bigger picture, here are a few pointers:

        1. Where do you see yourself in 10 years ? You need to be careful now, the mind will play all sorts of tricks to mask what you ‘really’ want. You need to brush those thoughts aside and confront the thoughts you are masking.

        You, Faiza, look like a very sweet and endearing woman; I am sure you would make a lovely partner, a beautiful mother, a consoling wife.
        Considering you are muslim, you probably want to be wed to a muslim man and have children too – there is nothing wrong with that, it is a very normal and natural urge.

        If you cannot find a suitable partner, maybe you are looking in the wrong place ? Maybe the type of man you desire is not to be found where you are currently living ? Maybe the area you are looking in does not have the “right” kind of guy, heck, maybe he is to be found in another country.

        If you want a man to exhibit certain ideals, maybe you need to them embed into yourself first ?

        2. What is your goal in life ? This question is a bit of a fallacy; why ? It doesn’t matter what goal you have, you can die before achieving it, during it, and you most certainly will be dead after it. So in the grand scheme of things, the goal is pointless, since it will ultimately lead to nothing. I guess one should be farsighted, and see the grand scheme of all matter and fixate on that. Everything else may be ephemeral but that finale is fixed, and thus one’s greatest effort should be on that finale. Most people call that finale, God. You are 30 years old today, tomorrow you’ll be 50 – remember that. I have found Al Ghazali to be a refreshing starting point from an islamic point of view.

        3. I sense cognitive dissonance with your current self and your religious convictions. I guess this is something else you should ponder. Is religion merely an identity ? or is it a tradition that you embody. Most people today either embody culture in the garb of religion, or limit their scope to just law, or just spirituality. One should be balanced and embody both realms, although the spiritual realm always precedes the law.

        These are testing times, most people are not what they portray themselves to be. Men are the worst, but sadly women are now catching up, and I feel your plight. Be patience, observant, and know that success is through God alone.

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